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Author Topic: New simplex owner  (Read 9197 times)
Mo in Mo
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« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2016, 02:48:16 PM »

So this project has taken me a lot longer then I would have liked. Its torn down and I'm starting to reassemble. I have rebuilt the carb and currently working on changing out the bearings. I plan on using the oven trick. I cleaned up the muffler and discovered it is copper. Is that common? It has the block welded to it for the wires for the headlight so it looks to be original. Is that correct?

Wayne has been very helpful in sending all the parts that I have needed.
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pd
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« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2016, 04:39:45 PM »

IMHO , it's best to not have a time frame for a project like this . Seems to me that a schedule would take the 'love/fun' out of the effort .

What do you suppose happened to that piston ?

Pete . Smiley
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RickS
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« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2016, 05:34:51 PM »

Looks like the cylinder had water in it.
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Rick
Mo in Mo
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« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2016, 05:41:51 PM »

Not sure on water, but lots of built up carbon deposit. Lots of elbow grease and it's shiny again.
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Bob53
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« Reply #19 on: December 10, 2016, 08:20:54 AM »

Hi MO, Welcome and what a find. Your's is only the 4th old complete direct I've ever seen. The original headlight was a Miller unit from England that ran off a rear wheel generator. The tailight was battery operated if it had one at all, some didn't. The brakes were Sturmey Archer bicycle drum brakes also from England. Your's looks original. Your lucky to have most of the original parts. Congratulations on the bike it's really special to be in that original condition. Bob
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Mo in Mo
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« Reply #20 on: December 10, 2016, 11:20:10 AM »

I'm needing some help getting the crankshaft out of the housing. Is anyone available for a few minutes to talk me through? If so message me and I will give you my number.


Thanks,

Lester

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pd
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« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2016, 11:55:33 AM »

I think the crankshaft should slip right out after the drive pulley is removed . The pulley has left handed threads .

I see you have the rod removed , so stick a piece of wood into the case from the top to keep the crank from turning . The rod mount makes a good stop .

Put a bolt into one of the holes in the pulley and use the crank as a pivot . I use a long heavy screwdriver .

Hope that helps .

Pete . Smiley
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Mo in Mo
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« Reply #22 on: December 10, 2016, 12:06:21 PM »

Pulley is already off. I need to get the crankshaft out of the housing, to change bearings. Do I put the whole housing crankshaft and all into oven? Should I remove crank from housing first and if so I do I do this without damaging something?
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RickS
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« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2016, 12:22:10 PM »

I have never done an early motor, all my experience is with the late style.  That being said, according to the early service manual, once the crank motor pulley is removed, the crankshaft will just slide out.  This is the same as a late motor.

I have had some that are stuck pretty good. This is what I do in these cases.  If it will not just slide out, I put the nut back on the end of the crank to protect the threads, then tap on the crank snout  with a plastic dead blow hammer.  If you do not have a dead blow hammer, I would put a block of wood on the crank and hit that with a ball-peen hammer.

Keep us updated!
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pd
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« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2016, 12:30:37 PM »

Maybe if you shot a bit of penetrating fluid in where the crank meets the bearings , then do that^ .

Pete . Smiley
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Mo in Mo
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« Reply #25 on: December 10, 2016, 12:42:13 PM »

Got it out. Piece of wood and light taping got it. Outer sleeve and bearings came off crankshaft but base is still there so I will need to put in oven to remove along with bearing on housing thanks for the help. Just vary careful with all the motor stuff since not a while lot available for the old stuff.
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RickS
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« Reply #26 on: December 10, 2016, 01:04:26 PM »

Do you have the manual?  I believe there are snap rings holding the bearing housings in.
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Rick
Mo in Mo
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« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2016, 01:11:21 PM »

I've got a manual that came with it. Only has writing, and for motor it says to send to factory and get a new motor for $15!!
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RickS
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« Reply #28 on: December 10, 2016, 01:14:36 PM »

Look in the manuals section.  I posted a 1947 manual in there.  I believe much of the info in that one will apply to your motor. I don't think they were that different.
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Rick
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« Reply #29 on: December 10, 2016, 04:23:47 PM »

What year was your manual printed Mo?
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